FCC seeks comments on a petition for extension of waiver related to accessibility of emergency information for the blind

Hurricane Andrew shown as a big red ring spinning over the map of South Florida
 

Yesterday, the Media Bureau* at the Federal Communication Commission (FCC) announced that is seeking comments on a joint petition related to accessibility of emergency information requirements.  This waiver has been requested jointly by the American Council of the Blind (ACB), the American Foundation for the Blind (AFB), and the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB).  Comments bill be received until April 13, 2018.

Are your Beeping Easter Eggs ready?

On dead grass, row of colored Easter eggs with faces painted
 

Every year, many ATF agents (who oversee violations of federal laws related to firearms, explosives, arson, and alcohol and tobacco diversion) work with communities across the country to make beeping Easter eggs.  Beeping eggs make it possible for blind or visually impaired children to enjoy the fun of the Easter egg hunts.

Lawsuit against Hulu because it fails to be accessible to the blind and visually impaired

A bold person with glasses watches TV
 

On November 20, the American Council of the Blind, Bay State Council of the Blind, and Brian and Kim Charlson, who are both blind, sued the video streaming company Hulu. There are 2 reasons for the lawsuit. First, none of Hulu's video content is offered with audio description, which in turn makes the video content inaccessible to people who are blind or visually impaired.  Second, Hulu's website and applications are also not accessible to people who are blind or visually impaired.

What traveling is like for a blind person

gray suitcase
 

Have you ever wondered how somebody could without vision navigate airports, train stations, hotels, etc.?  Tommy Edison, who is blind since birth and has a popular YouTube channel, has published an excellent video sharing part of his traveling experiences.

Improvements on Availability of Accessible Airport Kiosks

Row of airline kiosks at an airport
 

This is good news, 2 airlines will be making accessible, within 2 years, 50% of their automated kiosks at the airports.  By law, at least 25% of the automated kiosks installed by airlines after December 12-2016 at U.S. airports have to be accessible* and at least 25% of the automated kiosks in each location at the airport have to be accessible by December 12, 2022.