Blog - Regulation

Image outdoors. A woman with a coat holds a microphone and interviews a man. A city in the background,
 

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) will host a forum regarding the use of Enhanced Electronic Newsroom Technique (ENT) procedures for live captioning of local news programs. The forum will be on Friday, May 10, 2019, from 1:00 p.m. to 4:45 p.m., Eastern Time. It will be webcast with open captioning at www.fcc.gov/live.

A microphone pointing up and to the right. The letters AD that indicate audio description appear on the the bottom right.
 

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is preparing a report to Congress to inform about the availability, use, benefits and cost of video description. The Commission is asking TV stations and broadcast networks, multichannel video programming distributors (MVPDs), providers of video description, consumers of video description and anybody related to this topic to provide their feedback.

Headshot of Maria Diaz smiling. She has long brown her, dark brown eyes and tan ski.
 

We are honored to have Maria Victoria Diaz, Dicapta's President, appointed for a second term with the FCC's Disability Advisory Committee (DAC). The DAC provides advice and recommendations to the Commission on a wide array of disability matters specified by the Federal Communications Commission.

The word "accessible" on a laptop screen
 

G3ict The Global Initiative for Inclusive Accessibility of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTS) released its Digital Accessibility Rights Evaluation (DARE) Index 2017-2018 last month. The index measures the progress made by the 177 countries, that signed the 2006 Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), in promoting and implementing digital accessibility.

video production control panel
 

Starting July 4th, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) increased the mandatory number of hours of video description that TV stations and networks have to provide. Previously, the mandatory number of hours per quarter during prime time or children’s programming was 50.  Now, in addition to those 50 hours, the networks have to provide 37.5 hours per quarter between 6 a.m. and 11:59 p.m.

Hurricane Andrew shown as a big red ring spinning over the map of South Florida
 

Yesterday, the Media Bureau* at the Federal Communication Commission (FCC) announced that is seeking comments on a joint petition related to accessibility of emergency information requirements.  This waiver has been requested jointly by the American Council of the Blind (ACB), the American Foundation for the Blind (AFB), and the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB).  Comments bill be received until April 13, 2018.

2 binders on a table, On their spines is written “Compliance” and “Regulation”
 

New rules that assign responsibilities regarding the provision and quality of TV closed captioning entered into effect on December 22 of 2017.

A bold person with glasses watches TV
 

On November 20, the American Council of the Blind, Bay State Council of the Blind, and Brian and Kim Charlson, who are both blind, sued the video streaming company Hulu. There are 2 reasons for the lawsuit. First, none of Hulu's video content is offered with audio description, which in turn makes the video content inaccessible to people who are blind or visually impaired.  Second, Hulu's website and applications are also not accessible to people who are blind or visually impaired.

Row of airline kiosks at an airport
 

This is good news, 2 airlines will be making accessible, within 2 years, 50% of their automated kiosks at the airports.  By law, at least 25% of the automated kiosks installed by airlines after December 12-2016 at U.S. airports have to be accessible* and at least 25% of the automated kiosks in each location at the airport have to be accessible by December 12, 2022.